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Category Archive for: E-Discovery

6 Things to Include in E-Discovery “Quick Peek” Agreements

5 considerations for "quick peek" agreements which permit limited document review before production based on agreement to return privileged materials.

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What is a Computer File’s Hash Value?

E-discovery software assigns each file loaded a "hash value" (string of alphanumeric characters) used to identify duplicates and detect changes to the file.

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5 Things to Include in an E-Discovery Clawback Agreement

5 provisions to include in "clawback" agreements to protect attorney-client privilege and "claw back" privileged information produced in discovery.

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What Does DeNIST Mean and Why Should You Care?

"DeNisting" removes files from ESI collected for a legal matter with no evidentiary value and therefore should not be subject to attorney or computer review.

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Subpoenaed Database Info Must Be Searchable/Sortable (On Request)

California court holds subpoena recipient must provide database information in "reasonably usable form" requiring searchable and sortable digital files.

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What is Unallocated and Slack Space on a Computer Hard Drive?

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Production of Plaintiff’s Pain Journal in Original Digital Form Not Required by Fed. R. Civ. Proc. 34(b)

A federal magistrate judge in New Mexico denies a request for a plaintiff's pain journal in native format because it was not requested in its original form.

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7 Uses for E-Discovery Software Other Than Reviewing Documents

E-discovery software is mainly used to identify electronic documents and ESI relevant to a legal matter. However, there are other uses for the software.

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What is a Load File?

Attorneys dealing with electronic discovery (e-discovery) often produce electronic documents with "load files." But, what is a load file?

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E-Discovery Production Format: Opportunity Only Knocks Once

Although often overlooked, many court rules specifically state that litigants are not obligated to produce ESI in more than one form.

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