June 23, 2022

Artificial Intelligence and Legal Defensibility – Distinguishing AI Concepts and Explaining in Plain Language

Legal defensibility of artificial intelligence starts with distinguishing different AI concepts and explaining the results in plain language.
May 6, 2022

8 Ways to Reduce Data for Large Document Reviews

Eight techniques and strategies that we use to reduce data collections to manageable sizes for efficient document reviews.
March 24, 2022

Alternative Legal Service Providers (ALSPs) – Common Use Cases

Common tasks handled by ALSPs include Contract Review and Lifecycle Management, E-discovery and Legal Document Review, Compliance and Investigation support and Flexible Legal Staffing.
March 10, 2022

What is ECA (Early Case Assessment) and Why is it Important?

Early case assessment (ECA) provides an opportunity to understand evidence and also presents opportunities for fact finding and cost savings.
February 10, 2022

Overview: The Three Types of Forensic Collections – Physical vs. Logical vs. Targeted

Generally, there are three primary types of forensic image collection techniques: 1) creating a physical forensic image of the device; 2) collecting a logical image; or 3) doing a targeted collection of device data.
September 22, 2021

Does an Employer Have a Duty to Preserve an Employee’s Personal Cloud Storage

Depending on the court, a duty to preserve data in employees' personal cloud may arise if the employer has "practical ability" to access it.
September 8, 2021

Employee Theft Investigation: a Digital Forensics Case Study

An overview of the investigation techniques our digital forensics team used to uncover employee data theft of sensitive customer information.
August 31, 2021

Do Email Messages Have to Be Produced With Attachments in Litigation?

There is no hard and fast rule. But, there are a few legal arguments to support producing email messages with attachments.
August 26, 2021

When Must Litigant Provide Computer to Opponent for Examination?

Compelling a forensic examination of a computer hard drive generally requires a showing of discovery misconduct by the device owner.