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Category Archive for: Costs and Cost Shifting

You Subpoenaed My Documents, Shouldn’t You Pay for Them?

In federal litigation, responding party is generally responsible for subpoena costs. However, financial hardship or state statutes or rules may shift costs.

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3 Creative Ways to Reduce Document Review Volume

The first step in reducing document review costs is culling data to include only potentially relevant documents. Here are a few culling techniques we use.

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Tracking Legal Cost & E-Discovery Metrics – Custodians [Infographic]

The third in a series on legal and e-discovery cost metrics. In this installment e-discovery custodian metrics are examined.

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Do You Charge Your Clients for Page Numbers? (Your E-discovery Vendor Might)

Of course you do not charge your clients for page numbers. If you tried, they would not tolerate it. So stop paying for them in E-Discovery.

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Tracking Legal Cost & E-Discovery Metrics – a Prologue

The first in a series about legal cost and e-discovery metrics. We begin with an overview of tracking legal costs and explain why it is good to track them.

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Where Does the Money Go? (Infographic)

A list of legal spend and e-discovery metrics to consider tracking for budgeting and efficiency purposes.

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Are E-Discovery Bills Trade Secrets?

Judge permits Apple to file portions of e-discovery bills under seal finding them "confidential terms...of a financial relationship"

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Do I Have to Produce Deleted or Corrupted ESI?

Absent good cause, litigants generally need not produce ESI that is “not reasonably accessible." But, if produced, requesting party may have to pay for it.

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Heeding Voltaire, Judge Approves Bulk “Attorneys Eyes Only” Designations

In an attempt to lessen e-discovery costs, judge approves protective order permitting bulk designation of "Attorneys Eyes Only" discovery material.

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Subpoenaed Database Info Must Be Searchable/Sortable (On Request)

California court holds subpoena recipient must provide database information in "reasonably usable form" requiring searchable and sortable digital files.

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